• In early 18th-century Lisbon, Baltasar, a soldier who has lost his left hand in battle, falls in love with Blimunda, a young girl with visionary powers. From the day that he follows her home from the auto-da-fe where her mother is burned at the stake, the two are bound body and soul by love of an unassailable strength. A third party shares their supper that evening: Padre Bartolomeu Lourenco, whose fantasy is to invent a flying machine. As the Crown and the Church clash, they purse his impossible, not to mention heretical, dream of flight.

  • Virginie est à la recherche d'une baby-sitter pour son fils, celle-ci vient de mettre pieds chez elle. Mais, le courant a l'air de mal passer entre les deux. Elles doivent trouver un point concordant pour se rapprocher. Pas facile pour Virginie, puisqu'elle se rend compte que pas mal d'objets ne cessent de disparaître mystérieusement dans sa maison. Où se tourneront ses nombreuses intentions ? Sombre t-elle dans la paranoia ?

    Finalement, elle finit par trouver son coupable.

    Cette nouvelle est à dévorer.



    Biographie :

    Née en 1984, Divine Kanza est éditrice des éditions La lettrine Culture et Journaliste littéraire du magazine La lettrine Culture, mais elle reste avant tout une auteure. Son style d'écriture est cinématographique, loufoque, avec plein d'humour. Elle trouve sa place dans tous les registres littéraires. Son mouvement littéraire est le Burlesque : se traduisant par le cinéma, l'humour, le ton... Elle est également proverbiale et crée ses propres expressions françaises.


    Ses oeuvres contemporaines et classiques adaptées au style de Voltaire, Molière donnent un grand plaisir aux lecteurs.

  • The local and the universal come together in these 37 short stories, brought into English by 37 different translators from all over the world.

    The result gives readers a flavour of the fresh new writing coming out of Quebec-and a reminder that there are at least 37 different ways to translate an author's voice.

    Translators include literary translation students, first-time and up-and-coming literary translators, world-renowned translators who have won major international prizes, some of Montreal's best writers and translators, a retired high-school French teacher in Ireland, and francophone authors translating into their second language. There are even people in there who (armed only with a dictionary and the priceless ability to write a beautiful sentence) barely speak French.

  • Translation and Translating in German Studies is a collection of essays in honour of Professor Raleigh Whitinger, a well-loved scholar of German literature, an inspiring teacher, and an exceptional editor and translator. Its twenty chapters, written by Canadian and international experts explore new perspectives on translation and German studies as they inform processes of identity formation, gendered representations, visual and textual mediations, and teaching and learning practices. Translation (as a product) and translating (as a process) function both as analytical categories and as objects of analysis in literature, film, dance, architecture, history, second-language education, and study-abroad experiences. The volume arches from theory and genres more traditionally associated with translation (i.e., literature, philosophy) to new media (dance, film) and experiential education, and identifies pressing issues and themes that are increasingly discussed and examined in the context of translation. This study will be invaluable to university and college faculty working in the disciplines in German studies as well as in translation, cultural studies, and second-language education. Its combination of theoretical and practical explorations will allow readers to view cultural texts anew and invite educators to revisit long-forgotten or banished practices, such as translation in (auto)biographical writing and in the German language classroom.

  • This book is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Michael Berry, Professor of Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies at UCLA and a world-renowned Chinese literary translator and film scholar. After discussing the inspiring influence his English teacher had on him, the conversation covers topics such as the appeal of literary translation, modern and contemporary Chinese literature, the history and development of Chinese cinema, popular culture in modern China, censorship, and the importance of staying true to one's values.

    This carefully-edited book includes an introduction, Living Values, and questions for discussion at the end of each chapter:
    I. From New Jersey to Nanjing - Discovering another world
    II. Found in Translation - Manifesting values and creating impact
    /> III. Freedom of the Press - Rewriting novels and denying translations
    IV. Contemporary Voices - Literature, film, soft power, and cultural imbalances
    V. A Glimpse Behind the Lens - Chinese cinema and cinematographers
    VI. Business and Art - The Hollywood-Chinese axis vs. independent filmmakers
    VII. Flourishing - The power of values

    About Ideas Roadshow Conversations:

    This book is part of an expanding series of 100+ Ideas Roadshow conversations, each one presenting a wealth of candid insights from a leading expert through a focused yet informal setting to give non-specialists a uniquely accessible window into frontline research and scholarship that wouldn't otherwise be encountered through standard lectures and textbooks. For other books in this series visit our website: https://ideas-on-film.com/ideasroadshow/.

  • Ever heard people say things like, "A translation is no substitute for the original" or "Humour can't be translated into another language"? In this thought-provoking book, based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Princeton University Professor David Bellos, author of the bestselling book, Is That A Fish in Your Ear? Translation and the Meaning of Everything, many fascinating features of language and translation are explored at length.

    This carefully-edited book includes an introduction, Teaching a Man to Fish, and questions for discussion at the end of each chapter:

    I. Introductory Musings - On Perec, Chomsky, and other matters
    II. An Illustrative Capture - Learning from The Great Escape
    III. Getting the Joke - Translating Humour
    /> IV. Probing the Foreign - Dickens, word order, and Anglo-Italian gibberish
    V. Films in Translation - Subtitles, dubbing, and "The Bergman Effect"
    VI. The Varieties in English - In search of a middle form
    VII. Asserting Our Individuality - Language as an expression of our identity
    VIII. Translation and Meaning - Extending the Principle of Effability
    IX. Mathematics and Music - Pushing the boundaries of "language-like"
    X. Language and Thought - Plato, Hopi, and jumping mind-grooves
    XI. Paying Respects - Valuing the translator in our midst

    About Ideas Roadshow Conversations Series:

    This book is part of an expanding series of 100+ Ideas Roadshow conversations, each one presenting a wealth of candid insights from a leading expert in a relaxed and informal setting to give non-specialists a uniquely accessible window into frontline research and scholarship that wouldn't otherwise be encountered through standard lectures and textbooks. For other books in this series visit our website: https://ideas-on-film.com/ideasroadshow/.

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