Saga Egmont

  • The swineherd John spots a tree outside the palace that it is so high it reaches the sky. It blossoms in the morning, by noon it bears fruits and by midnight they are ripe. However someone steals each and every apple and the king does not get to taste it. Furious, hr decides to find out who the culprit is. Find out the end of this Hungarian fairy tale in "The Tree That Reached the Sky".

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Gyula Illyés was a Hungarian author who lived in the period 1902-1983. He mainly wrote novels and poems which discussed current problems in the society and politics. He spoke on behalf of the poor and wrote about the oppressed peasant class and the misery that they had to live in. He was always on their side and therefore was he often called a writer "from the people". Instead of trying to hide social injustices, he wanted to give them a voice through his work.

  • Hildred Castaigne is a young man who lives in New York City whose life changes drastically after he falls from his horse and injures his head. Castaigne gets unjustly confined to a mental institution, where Dr. Archer treats him. However, the doctor soon realizes, that this is a mistake and the young man's condition is not as bad as he was told. During Hildred's treatment, the United States have prospered and improved their infrastructure, a new aristocratic elite has been formed and suicide has been legalized.
    Who is responsible for Hildred Castaigne's wrong diagnosis? How will Castaigne adapt to the new society? Who is the "Repairer of Reputation" and will he help Castaigne? Find all the answers in Robert William Chambers' short story 1895 "The Repairer of Reputations".

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Robert William Chambers (1865 - 1933) was one of the most popular fiction writers in American. Born and educated in Brooklyn, Chambers joined the Art Students' League at the age of twenty, where one of his fellow student was Charles Dana Gibson. Robert Chambers remains best known for his collection of short stories named "The King in Yellow" from 1895.

  • William and Elizabeth are aboard a ship, together with their four sons, when a storm breaks out. William prays for their salvation, but this does not seem to be enough and the ship gets wrecked. The six-member family survive by finding their way to an isolated tropical island, but now they are alone and abandoned and can only survive if they stick together. They build a camp, but one of the sons is sent off to find a more permanent shelter. During his expedition, he meets a young girl named Jenny Montrose.

    What was the family doing on the ship? Where were they heading to? Will they find a permanent shelter? Who is Jenny and what is she doing on the island? Is she to be the family's salvation?

    Find all the answers in Johann Wyss' book "The Swiss Family Robinson" from 1812.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Johann David Wyss (1743 - 1818) was a Swiss author. He was inspired by Daniel Defoe's notorious character of Robinson Crusoe, whose adventures were of great interest to Wyss' four sons. His most popular book is "The Swiss Family Robinson", with which he wanted to teach his children an important lesson. The book was later edited by his son Johann Rudolf Wyss, who also wrote the Swiss national anthem.

  • An impoverished Oxford scholar decides to quit his studies and joins a group of gipsies. He absorbs their customs, trades and traditional way of learning. He learns that wisdom is not only to be found in schools and universities. It is among us and it is up to us to open our eyes to it. Matthew Arnold's "The Scholar Gipsy" reminds us of this.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Matthew Arnold was an English poet who lived in the period 1822-1888. His works depict the social issues of his time and therefore he was often called a sage writer. He was well aware of his place in poetry as he wrote to his mother that his poems "represent, on the whole, the main movement of mind of the last quarter of a century". Matthew Arnold's most significant works are "Culture and Anarchy", a work of criticism, "Empedocles of Etna" and "The Scholar Gipsy". Matthew Arnold is considered to be one of the three major poets of the Victorian era, along with Tennyson and Browning.

  • Mr. Cave is an antique shop owner with some curious items in his collection. One of these if an extraordinary crystal egg, which he comes across one evening. Indeed, the egg seems to be a gateway to the planet Mars. This science fiction short story by H. G. Wells dating back to the late 19th century has inspired numerous other literary pieces, as well as radio and television adaptations. "The Crystal Egg" is considered to be a precursor to H. G. Wells' famous science fiction novel "The War of the Worlds" from 1898.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Herbert George Wells (1866-1946), aka H. G. Wells, was an English writer and social critic. Wells wrote in a variety of genres and styles, most famously science fiction. Once called "the Shakespeare of science fiction", his works are full time travel, mad scientists and alternate universes. Wells' short stories and novels have appeared on the screen countless times as film and television adaptations. One of these is "War of the Worlds" (2005) starring Tom Cruise, a film version of Wells' novel The War of the Worlds.

  • Conger is in jail and given an opportunity to get out on one condition: he must go back in time and kill a man whose impact changed the world for centuries to come. He receives a skull, which he can use to identify the man when he gets to a different time. Yet upon arriving, he soon discovers that the task will have far more serious consequences than he had ever imagined.
    The science fiction short story "The Skull" by Philip K. Dick was first published in 1952 and has been republished several times since. Hear the classic as read by B.J. Harrison.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was a prolific and influential American writer who worked in the genre of science fiction. His works carry themes such as alternate realities, authoritarian governments and human nature. Dick won several awards, including a Hugo Award for Best Novel for his novel "The Man in the High Castle" (1962). His works have become part of popular culture, including the cult film "Blade Runner" (1982), which is based on Dick's novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" (1968).

  • Goodman Brown is a young man who leads a normal and peaceful life with his wife Faith. However one evening, he leaves his wife and heads out to the forest. He has to run an unknown and urgent errand. There, he meets an old man who strangely resembles Brown a lot. Together, they walk deeper in the woods and suddenly Brown hears Faith's voice coming from an unknown direction. He runs angrily through the forest when he stumbles upon a strange ceremony. Goodman Brown's adventure through the woods is a symbol for his journey into self-scrutiny. But is he being tortured through a dream or it this all reality?

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American author who lived in the period 1804-1864. He is best known as novelist and short-story writer. His literary style belongs to dark romanticism. Morality, religion, guilt and sin were topics he often took up in his stories. History, symbolism and psychology were also often intertwined in his works. To this day, he is considered to be one of the greatest fiction writers in American literature. Some of Hawthorne's most popular novels are "The Scarlet Letter", "The House of Seven Gables" and "The Marble Faun".

  • "Uncle Silas" is a Gothic locked-room mystery novel by Sheridan Le Fanu. Maud Ruthyn is an orphan, left in the care of her mysterious and evil uncle Silas. The latter keeps thinking up new and creative ways to get rid of his niece. In a similar vein to Wilkie Collins' novels, Le Fanu's "Uncle Silas" depicts a heroine in danger, who moves from one hair-raising adventure to the next, making it a perfect, terrifying, horror tale of greed and vile intentions.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) was an Irish author of short stories and novels. He was one of the most important writers of Gothic, mystery and horror stories of the Victorian era. Le Fanu's influence cannot be neglected, for he helped develop the writing styles for atmosphere, setting, and narration. His most important works are "Uncle Silas", "The House by the Churchyard", and his short story collection "In a Glass Darkly".

  • The infamous Baron Munchausen is capable of everything and anything. Escaping from a hungry lion's jaws, shooting a male red deer with cherry stones or climbing a beanstalk all the way to the moon are but a small part of his adventures. Every new one is more surprising and exciting than the previous one. If you want to learn more about Baron Munchausen, do not hesitate to embark on this journey.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Rudolf Erich Raspe (1736 - 1794) was a German writer, scientist and librarian, best known for his collection of tall tales "The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen" (1785). After he finished his education in natural science and philology at Gttingen and Leipzig, Raspe worked as a librarian of the Landgraf's collection of gems and coins. Later on, he was charged with stealing from Landgraf's gems and was forced to run away to England to escape arrest.

  • Jerome, George and Harris are three hypochondriacal friends who like to spend time comparing their illnesses, although none of them is ill. One day they decide to go on a vacation by sailing down the Thames river towards Oxford. The three friends prepare a long list of things they will need and even take the dog Montmorency with them. During the journey they visit many different places and fall into various and interesting situations.

    For what reason do the friends compare their illnesses? Is there any competition between them? How did they decide to go on this adventure down the Thames river? Will they bring all the things needed for their survival? How will their adventure end?

    Find all the answers in Jerome K. Jerome's humorous novel "Three Men in a Boat" from 1889.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 - 1927) was an English writer and humorist. Inspired by his sister's love for the theatre, he decided to try his luck in acting, but gave up after three years of no visible success. Jerome is best known for his comic novel "Three Men in a Boat" from 1889, a work that brought him large popularity. Some other popular works are the two collections of essays "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow" and "Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow", and the novel "Three Men on the Bummel".

  • An old grey-bearded mariner returns from a long sea voyage. He stops a guest at a wedding ceremony and tries to tell him the story of his greatest adventure. At first, the man doesn't want to listen but the mariner's glittering eyes captivates him. The sailor begins his story, which turns out to be as exciting as he claimed. "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is the longest, major poem in British literature and marks the shift from romantic poetry to modern poetry. Embark on the mariner's extraordinary journey through B. J. Harrison's fantastic narration.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834) was an English philosopher, theologian, poet and critic. He is considered as the founder of the English Romantic Movement and worked closely with many other famous writer and thinkers of his time. Some of his most famous works are the two poems "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Kubla Khan", along with the major prose work "Biographia Literaria". Coleridge was one of the William Shakespeare's greatest critics.

  • Hear the beloved children's tale as read by B.J. Harrison. "The Wind in the Willows" follows the eventful adventures of four animals: Mole, Rat, Toad and Badger, as they navigate twists of friendship, dangers and changing surroundings. This 20th-century novel has become known and loved through countless adaptations on the screen and stage alike, including the animated Disney adaptation The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) and the British film The Wind in the Willows (1996) starring Steve Coogan.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932) was a Scottish writer of children's stories loved by children and adults alike. He is perhaps best-known for his novel "The Wind in the Willows" from 1908, featuring memorable animal figures and the especially beloved Toad character. The story has inspired numerous adaptations, with film adaptations including the British film The Wind in the Willows (1996), featuring Steve Coogan. Part of the story was also adapted by author A.A. Milne for the play "Toad of Toad Hall" in 1929.

  • Antoine Breguet is an old watchmaker who wants to retire. One of his two apprentices is going to take his place, but which one? Who is better qualified and who will impress the watchmaker's granddaughter more? The two men are ready to compete. Whoever comes up with the best, most exquisite and intricate creation will inherit Breguet's shop. However friendship and love stand in the way. What will happen with the two friends and their future as watchmakers? Find out in Lydia Child's "The Rival Mechanicians".

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Lydia Maria Child was an American writer who lived in the period 1802-1880. Her works often depicted antislavery related issues. She was women's rights activist and Native American rights activist and she took on those topics in some of her stories as well. This brought her a wide audience, but there were also many people who could not understand and criticised her social position and works. Some of her best known stories are "An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans", a work related to the history of slavery, "The Frugal Housewife", a book depicting women's rights and "An Appeal for the Indians", a story about the Native Americans and their lives as oppressed members of the society.

  • "The Tragedy of Coriolanus" falls into the category of Shakespeares' political tragedies. It tells of the story of the legendary Roman hero Caius Marcius Coriolanus. Coriolanus' military success helps him get forward in Rome's political life, and he soon starts dreaming of a leadership position. Unfortunately, too much power inevitably leads to corruption, and Coriolanus' fate is no exception.
    A detailed exploration of power struggles, political issues, and what it means to be a man, "The Tragedy of Coriolanus" is on the one hand a harsh critique of power and greed, and on the other hand, it is the rise-and-fall tale of an intriguing and virtuous character.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an English playwright and poet, often regarded as the greatest dramatist and writer in the English language. He wrote more than 150 sonnets, and 39 plays, which have been translated into many languages. Among his most popular plays are the comedies "The Comedy of Errors" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream", the histories "Richard III" and "Henry V", as well as the tragedies "Hamlet" and "King Lear".

  • B.J. Harrison reads a science fiction classic by Philip K. Dick. In a post-nuclear world, self-replicating robots are on the loose and thinking independently. Although originally designed to kill Soviet agents, the robots can no longer be trusted. The science fiction story "The Second Variety" from the mid-20th-century examines a world where nuclear war has left behind little of the world known to us and survival becomes increasingly difficult. The story was a finalist for the 1954 Retro-Hugo Award for Best Novelette and was turned into the science fiction horror film "Screamers" (1995).

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was a prolific and influential American writer who worked in the genre of science fiction. His works carry themes such as alternate realities, authoritarian governments and human nature. Dick won several awards, including a Hugo Award for Best Novel for his novel "The Man in the High Castle" (1962). His works have become part of popular culture, including the cult film "Blade Runner" (1982), which is based on Dick's novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" (1968).

  • Jim Hawkins is a young boy who lives at his parents' inn, near Bristol. After Billy Bones, an old sea captain, mysteriously dies at the inn, Hawkins unlocks his sea chest and finds a treasure map. The mysterious treasure map arouses Jim's curiosity and sparks a wild and adventurous treasure hunt. Before long, Jim has gathered a crew of untrustworthy pirates and sails off to Treasure Island. Long John Silver with his missing leg and his parrot is part of the voyage.

    How did captain Billy Bones die? Was he murdered? Where did he get the treasure map from? Will Jim Hawkins and his crew reach Treasure Island? What is John Silver's role in this story? Find all the answers in Robert Louis Stevenson's adventure 1883 novel "Treasure Island".

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was a Scottish writer of novels, poems, essays, and travel books. For most of his life, Stevenson suffered from serious bronchial issues, but he kept on travelling and writing. Although his writing has often been considered pure entertainment, author Henry James aligned Stevenson's works with his own. His most famous novels are "Treasure Island" (1883), "Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" (1886), "Kidnapped" (1886) and "A Child's Garden of Verses" (1885).

  • "When the World Was Young" introduces us to a thief named Dave Slotter, who intends to steal from James Ward - a famous and wealthy businessman. However, while Slotter walks through Ward's property, he encounters a wild barbarian and is forced to fight for his life.
    Will Slotter escape from the wild man who wants to kill him? Who is the barbarian and what is he doing on Ward's lands? Will the thief succeed in his plan?

    "Moon-Face" introduces us to John Claverhouse, a man who is unreasonably despised. The narrator of this story does his best to get rid of the poor man but fails with every attempt. However, tired of all his failures, the narrator decides to kill Claverhouse. For this purpose, he buys a dog.
    Why is Claverhouse hated by everyone? Why does the nameless narrator want to kill the man? How is the dog going to help him with his vicious plan?

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Jack London (1876-1916) was an American writer and social activist. He grew up in the working class, but became a worldwide celebrity and one of the highest paid authors of his time. He wrote several novels that are considered classics today, among these are 'Call of the Wild', 'Sea Wolf' and 'White Fang'.

  • After a passionate affair with Agnes Keith-Wessington, Jack Pansay wearies of her and becomes engaged to Miss Kitty Mannering. However, Wessington refuses to accept the rejection and reappears in Jack's life, trying to make him reconsider. But to her greatest regret, Pansay continues to respond curtly and brutally. Not so long after, Agnes dies of a broken heart. From this moment on, Jack's life will never be the same again.

    Why did Pansay reject Wessington? How is he going to react to her death? Will he marry Miss Kitty, or will she break off the engagement? Find all the answers in Rudyard Kipling's 1888 ghost story "The Phantom Rickshaw".

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was a British journalist, poet and novelist, most famous for his collection of stories, "The Jungle Book" (1894). He spent a good part of his childhood and youth in India where his stories are set. In 1907, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature as the youngest recipient ever. Some other famous works by Kipling are "Kim" (1901), "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888) and "Mandalay" (1890)

  • "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," also known simply as "The Wizard of Oz" is a famous children's novel by Frank L. Baum. Written at the start of the 20th century, it is one of the most famous fantasy stories to date, now brought to life by B. J. Harrison.
    Dorothy is a young girl living peacefully on a Kansas prairie, when a cyclone swoops her and her dog Toto into the magical Land of Oz. Is there a way for them to get back home from this new and strange place, where dangers and astonishing creatures await? The novel has been adapted into the beloved film version The Wizard of Oz (1939) starring Judy Garland.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Lyman Frank Baum (1856-1919), aka L. Frank Baum, was an American author, poet and scriptwriter. Primarily known for his children's books, he is most famous for the novel "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" and its sequels. His stories feature adventure and fantasy, and are a reinvention of familiar fairy tales. Baum's works have been featured on stage and films, most famously in the iconic Oscar-winning film adaptation The Wizard of Oz (1939), based on Baum's novel of the same name, starring Judy Garland.

  • "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark" is perhaps the most influential and widely acclaimed play by William Shakespeare. The tragedy follows Prince Hamlet as he concocts a plan to avenge the death of his father, who was murdered by his uncle Claudius in order to take the throne. Suspenseful, supernatural, moody, and full of twists, Hamlet is an exploration of the human condition, of the troubled psyche of the prince and his relationship with his mother and lover, as well as of pity, horror, and vengeance. The ending is truly haunting and compelling, turning the play into a must for readers everywhere.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an English playwright and poet, often regarded as the greatest dramatist and writer in the English language. He wrote more than 150 sonnets, and 39 plays, which have been translated into many languages. Among his most popular plays are the comedies "The Comedy of Errors" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream", the histories "Richard III" and "Henry V", as well as the tragedies "Hamlet" and "King Lear".

  • After a long stay in South Africa, Richard Hannay arrives back in London just before the outbreak of World War One. There he meets Franklin Scudder, who claims to be investigating the Black Stone - a German spy organization. Hannay gives a shelter to the man but one day he finds him dead. Now the Scotsman fears that he might be the next one on the Black Stone's list. Hannay decides to go back to his native Scotland with the notebook Scudder gave him before he was murdered.

    Who is responsible for Scudder's murder? Is it the Black Stone or it is someone else? How will Hannay be involved in this story? What will he find in the mysterious notebook? Can he deal with the German spy organization on his own?

    Find all the answers in John Buchan's adventure novel "The Thirty-Nine Steps" from 1915.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    John Buchan (1875 - 1940) was a Scottish writer, historian, lawyer and government administrator. At the age of seventeen he studied classics and mathematics at Glasgow University. With his second scholarship from Oxford Brasenose College, Buchan graduated with a Doctor of Laws degree. He admired Sir Walter Scott and was inspired by his works. John Buchan's most famous work is the spy thriller novel "The Thirty-Nine Steps", which was written during First World War.

  • "The Return of Dr. Fu-Manchu" is the second novel in the Fu-Manchu series, in which the villainous doctor returns to Britain in order to undermine the country's power. He has survived the previous novel's deadly attackand is now on the move against the forces of good, embodied by detective Smith and Dr. Petrie, who always disrupt his plans. Fu-Manchu's fanatical devotion to world domination and all things evil make Rohmer's novel a joyride through the actions and thoughts of his superbly-crafted villain. But Rohmer's novel also discusses social and political issues, flavoured with some racial prejudices, making it a rich and enjoyable read.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Sax Rohmer (1883-1959), the pseudonym of Arthur Henry Ward, was a British writer of crime and supernatural fiction, famous for the creation of the villain Fu-Manchu. The occult played an important part in his life, and many of his works are directly influenced by it. He wrote many novels, short stories, and non-fiction works, among which were "The Fu-Manchu" series, "Brood of the Witch-Queen", and "The Yellow Claw".

  • Holroyd is an unpleasant man who is in charge of a power station supporting an underground electric railway. Azuma-zi is a stranger who arrives from the East and soon finds a job at this power station. Holroyd starts to pick on Azuma-zi, lecturing him against religion and describing the dynamo as the only god. Soon enough, Azuma-zi begins to worship the dynamo, with disastrous consequences. H. G. Wells' short story "The Lord of the Dynamos" describes a clash of cultures in a hard, industrial setting. The story, which dates back to the late 19th century, is brought to life by B. J. Harrison.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Herbert George Wells (1866-1946), aka H. G. Wells, was an English writer and social critic. Wells wrote in a variety of genres and styles, most famously science fiction. Once called "the Shakespeare of science fiction", his works are full time travel, mad scientists and alternate universes. Wells' short stories and novels have appeared on the screen countless times as film and television adaptations. One of these is "War of the Worlds" (2005) starring Tom Cruise, a film version of Wells' novel The War of the Worlds.

  • A man travels through the frozen wasteland bordering the Yukon River, accompanied by his best friend - a large husky dog. The dog tries to dissuade the man from walking farther into the frozen land, but the man pushes on. At some point the man decides to stop and build a fire. Unfortunately, snow falls from one of the trees and extinguishes the fire. This is the moment where the problems truly begin.
    Why is the man travelling through the Canadian frozen lands? Where is he heading to? Will he manage to restart the fire? Will he and his friend survive in the harsh weather?

    Find all the answers in Jack London's short story "To Build a Fire" from 1908.

    B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting to breathe new life into classic stories. He masterfully plays with a wide array of voices and accents and has since then produced over 500 audiobooks. Now in collaboration with SAGA Egmont, his engaging narration of these famous classics is available to readers everywhere.

    Jack London (1876-1916) was an American writer and social activist. He grew up in the working class, but became a worldwide celebrity and one of the highest paid authors of his time. He wrote several novels that are considered classics today, among these are "Call of the Wild", "Sea Wolf" and "White Fang".

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