Michael B. A. Oldstone

  • Molecular Mimicry, Microbial Infection and Autoimmune Disease: Evolution of the Concept.- A Virus-Induced Molecular Mimicry Model of Multiple Sclerosis.- Suppression of Autoimmunity via Microbial Mimics of Altered Peptide Ligands.- Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms, Pathogenesis and Treatment of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Obtained Through Study of a Transgenic Model of Molecular Mimicry.- Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Molecular Mimicry and Chagas' Disease.- HTLV-1-Induced Molecular Mimicry in Neurologic Disease.- Molecular Mimicry: Anti-DNA Antibodies Bind Microbial and Non-Nucleic Acid Self Antigens.- The Structural Interactions Between T-Cell Receptors and MHC/Peptide Complexes Place Physical Limits on Self-Nonself Discrimination.- Subject Index

  • Measles virus, one of the most contagious of all human viruses, has been largely contained by the development and use of a vaccine that was introduced 50 years ago. These two volumes were timed to honor the introduction of the vaccine and to record the enormous advancements made in understanding the molecular and cell biology, pathogenesis, and control of this infectious disease. Where vaccine has been effectively delivered, endemic measles virus transmission has been eliminated. However, difficulties in vaccine delivery, lack of health care support and objection to vaccination in some communities continue to result in nearly 40 million cases and over 300,000 deaths per year from measles.
    By itself measles virus infection has and still provides some of the most interesting phenomena in biology. Following infection of dendritic cells, measles virus causes a profound suppression of the host's immune response that lasts a number of months after apparent recovery from infection. Indeed, measles virus was the first virus to be associated with immunosuppression with many of the manifestations to be observed one hundred years later with HIV infection. Measles is also associated with development of both post-infectious encephalomyelitis, an autoimmune demyelinating disease, and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder. How measles virus infects cells, spreads to various tissues and causes disease, as well as the role of the immune response, generation of new vaccines, and use as a vector for gene delivery are topics covered in these two volumes.

  • This two-volume work covers the molecular and cell biology, genetics and evolution of influenza viruses, the pathogenesis of infection, resultant host innate and adaptive immune response, prevention of infection through vaccination and approaches to the therapeutic control of infection.. Experts at the forefront of these areas provide critical assessments with regard to influenza virology, immunology, cell and molecular biology, and pathogenesis. Volume I provides overviews of the latest findings on molecular determinants of viral pathogenicity, virus entry and cell tropism, pandemic risk assessment, transmission and pathogenesis in animal species, viral evolution, ecology and antigenic variation, while Volume II focuses on the role of innate and adaptive immunity in pathogenesis, development of vaccines and antivirals. 

  • This volume focuses on the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its analogs in the induced sequestration of lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs or in the microenvironment of tissues involved in infection or autoimmune disease. Initial chapters define the pathways to understand S1P signaling. They cover the organization of signaling systems, the structural biology of the S1P1 receptor, and the chemical and genetic tools that are available and useful to explore this area of research and therapeutics. The later chapters highlight S1P and endothelial integrity, lymphocyte migration in the spleen, and S1P agonist in controlling immunopathologic manifestations of acute respiratory influenza virus infection (in the lung), and its accompanying cytokine storm as well as immunopathologic disease of the central nervous system, including the beginning of treatments in multiple sclerosis. One chapter reveals the possible involvement of other lipid molecules, their use for better understanding lipid signaling, and their potential in the modulation of immune responses.

  • This two-volume work covers the molecular and cell biology, genetics and evolution of influenza viruses, the pathogenesis of infection, resultant host innate and adaptive immune response, prevention of infection through vaccination and approaches to the therapeutic control of infection.. Experts at the forefront of these areas provide critical assessments with regard to influenza virology, immunology, cell and molecular biology, and pathogenesis. Volume I provides overviews of the latest findings on molecular determinants of viral pathogenicity, virus entry and cell tropism, pandemic risk assessment, transmission and pathogenesis in animal species, viral evolution, ecology and antigenic variation, while Volume II focuses on the role of innate and adaptive immunity in pathogenesis, development of vaccines and antivirals. 

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