Margaret Archer

  • This book, the last volume in the Social Morphogenesis series, examines whether or not a Morphogenic society can foster new modes of human relations that could exercise a form of `relational steering', protecting and promoting a nuanced version of the good life for all. It analyses the way in which the intensification of morphogenesis and the diminishing of morphostasis impact upon human flourishing. The book links intensified morphogenesis to promoting human flourishing based on the assumption that new opportunities open up novel experiences, skills, and modes of communication that appeal to talents previously lacking any outlet or recognition. It proposes that equality of opportunity would increase as ascribed characteristics diminished in importance, and it could be maintained as the notion of achievement continued to diversify. Digitalization has opened the cultural `archive' for more to explore and, as it expands exponentially, so do new complementary compatibilities whose development foster yet further opportunities. If more people can do more of what they do best, these represent stepping stones towards the `good life' for more of them.

  • This volume explores the development and consequences of morphogenesis on normative regulation. It starts out by describing the great normative transformations from morphostasis, as the precondition of a harmonious relationship between legal validity and normative consensus in society, to morphogenesis, which tends to strongly undermine existing laws, norms, rules, rights and obligations because of the new variety it introduces. Next, it studies the decline of normative consensus resulting from the changes in the social contexts that made previous forms of normativity, based upon `habits, `habitus' and `routine action', unhelpfully misleading because they no longer constituted relevant guidelines to action. It shows how this led to the `Reflexive Imperative' with subjects having to work out their own purposeful actions in relation to their objective social circumstances and their personal concerns, if they were to be active rather than passive agents. Finally, the book analyses what makes for chance in normativity, and what will underwrite future social regulation. It discusses whether it is possible to establish a new corpus of laws, norms and rules, given that intense morphogenesis denies the durability of any new stable context.

  • This volume examines how generative mechanisms emerge in the social order and their consequences. It does so in the light of finding answers to the general question posed in this book series: Will Late Modernity be replaced by a social formation that could be called Morphogenic Society? This volume clarifies what a `generative mechanism' is, to achieve a better understanding of their social origins, and to delineate in what way such mechanisms exert effects within a current social formation, either stabilizing it or leading to changes potentially replacing it . The book explores questions about conjuncture, convergence and countervailing effects of morphogenetic mechanisms in order to assess their impact. Simultaneously, it looks at how products of positive feedback intertwine with the results of (morphostatic) negative feedback. This process also requires clarification, especially about the conditions under which morphostasis prevails over morphogenesis and vice versa. It raises the issue as to whether their co-existence can be other than short-lived. The volume addresses whether or not there also is a process of `morpho-necrosis', i.e. the ultimate demise of certain morphostatic mechanisms, such that they cannot `recover'. The book concludes that not only are generative mechanisms required to explain associations between variables involved in the replacement of Late Modernity by Morphogenic Society, but they are also robust enough to account for cases and times when such variables show no significant correlations.

  • Late Modernity

    Margaret S. Archer

    This volume examines the reasons for intensified social change after 1980; a peaceful process of a magnitude that is historically unprecedented. It examines the kinds of novelty that have come about through morphogenesis and the elements of stability that remain because of morphostasis. It is argued that this pattern cannot be explained simply by `acceleration'. Instead, we must specify the generative mechanism(s) involved that underlie and unify ordinary people's experiences of different disjunctions in their lives. The book discusses the umbrella concept of `social morphogenesis' and the possibility of transition to a `Morphogenic Society'. It examines possible `generative mechanisms' accounting for the effects of `social morphogenesis' in transforming previous and much more stable practices. Finally, it seeks to answer the question of what is required in order to justify the claim that Morphogenic society can supersede modernity.

  • Social Morphogenesis

    Margaret S. Archer

    • Springer
    • 20 Février 2013

    The rate of social change has speeded up in the last three decades, but how do we explain this? This volume ventures what the generative mechanism is that produces such rapid change and discusses how this differs from late Modernity. Contributors examine if an intensification of morphogenesis (positive feedback that results in a change in social form) and a corresponding reduction in morphostasis (negative feedback that restores or reproduces the form of the social order) best captures the process involved.  This volume resists proclaiming a new social formation as so many books written by empiricists have done by extrapolating from empirical data.  Until we can convincingly demonstrate that a new generative mechanism is at work, it is premature to argue what accounts for the global changes that are taking place and where they will lead. More concisely we seek to answer the question whether or not current social change can be regarded as social morphogenesis. Only then, in the next volumes will the same team of authors be able to remove the question mark.

  • Le numéro d'automne de TicArtToc explore la question de l'exil des artistes et plonge au coeur de trajectoires souvent forcées. L'exil peut prendre différentes formes et être vécu par chacun de façon différente. Les collaborateurs de TicArtToc, Pierre Ansay, Catherine Barnabé, Hanieh Ziaei et Jacques-Bernard Roumanes, réfléchissent sur les diverses facettes et impacts de l'exil, tantôt vu comme une expérience positive, comme une renaissance ou un nouveau départ, tantôt vu dans une conception négative, davantage comme une déchirure ou avec frustration. Comment les artistes définissent-ils l'exil, de quelle manière le vivent-ils au quotidien ? De quelle manière l'exil teinte-t-il leurs pratiques? Trouvez réponse à ces questions en lisant les portraits des artistes Yazan Charif par Fanny Guérin, Quinten Sheriff par Tessy Jean-Paul, Adriana Garcia-Cruz par Mylène de Repentigny-Corbeil et Farooq Fazeli par Héloïse Landry.

empty